Category Archives: Children’s Organization

Laundry Room Reno: An exhaustive guide

The laundry room has finally come into its own as a bright and organized cleanup command center, whether in a tidy corner of the basement or a nook next to the kitchen.  For help updating yours, visit our website, www.theclosetenvy.com to schedule your free consultation!

Organization Central

a remodeled laundry room with green towels

PHOTO BY NATHAN KIRKMAN

Keep reading to see our expert advice on everything from energy-wise machines and thrifty flooring options to the best labor-saving layout and how to safeguard the house from a potential flood or fire!

Where to Put Your Laundry Room

an upper floor laundry room
PHOTO BY DEBORAH WHITLAW LLEWELLYN

For lots of us, the basement is just fine. But many homeowners who can spare the space and expense prefer to have the laundry closer to bedrooms or the kitchen. Here’s what to factor in before making a move.

On an upper floor
Pros: Proximity to where dirty clothes are shed lessens schlepping distance with hampers. Can tap into existing plumbing lines if in or near a bathroom.
Cons: Noise and vibration require extra insulation and a motion-arresting pad. Leaks can damage first-floor rooms. Closet installation requires a vented door and additional space around stacked machines to dissipate dryer heat.

Where to Put It (Continued)

a first floor laundry room
PHOTO BY JOE SCHMELZER

On the first floor
Pros: Near where most other house-keeping chores take place.  May be able to share kitchen or powder-room plumbing lines.
Cons: Laundry can pile up in cooking, eating, and foot-traffic areas. Need to carry hampers upstairs. Machines hidden in cabinets require vented doors and clearance space for proper ventilation.

Low-Impact Layout

a laundry room designed for a small space
PHOTO BY ZACK BENSON/CORNERHOUSE STOCK

You don’t need a huge space.  In fact, some of the most efficient laundry rooms are quite small, with the following four elements arranged in close proximity, not more than a step or two away from one another:

1. Appliances: Stack them or put them side by side to transfer wet clothes easily from washer to dryer. Machines should be placed directly in front of utility hookups.

2. Supplies: Store detergent, stain sticks, and other clothing-care items, such as a sewing kit, in closed cabinets, cubbies, or open shelving that’s above or next to machines.

3. Baskets: Leave enough room in front of machines to empty or fill them easily, and create a nearby niche to tuck baskets or hampers out of the way but within easy grabbing distance.

4. Work surface: Add a counter or a freestanding table adjacent to stacked or top-loading machines for sorting, treating, and folding. With front loaders placed side by side, consider installing a counter on top of the machines to save space.

Comfortable Clearances

a laundry room illustrated to show clearances
ILLUSTRATION BY IAN WORPOLE

Consider these measurements before hooking up machines or adding built-in storage to keep your laundry room looking—and working—its best.

Delivery-Day Reminder: Measure the dimensions of not only the area where the machines will be installed but also doorways and stairwells that they will have to pass through to get to the laundry room. Most machines need about a 30-inch-wide opening.

The Case for Front Loaders

an illustration of a washer with a crown on its head
ILLUSTRATION BY EDWIN FOTHERINGHAM

They cost about $150 to $300 more, but front-loading washers tend to clean better and more efficiently than most top loaders—a faster spin cycle, up to 1,200 rpm, wrings out more water to cut drying time and energy consumption. A front loader also offers design flexibility and comfort; you can stack it with a dryer to save floor space, top it with a counter for folding, or raise it on a pedestal to a back-friendly height. To do the latter with a top-loading washer, you’d have to be part giraffe to reach inside the machine.

Front-Loader Add-On: Pedestals

a washer with built-in pedestal/drawers, blue walls
PHOTO BY MARK LUND/GETTY IMAGES

$100-$300

• Good storage for tight quarters because they sit beneath machines and don’t eat up floor space.

• Elevate the washer and dryer, saving you from having to bend over as much to reach into the machines.

• Drawer can be ordered from the manufacturer that makes your machines for a perfect match. Just be sure to check specs; drawers should be deep enough (typically 12 to 15 inches) to hold detergent bottles upright.

Front-Loader Add-On: Countertop

a black-colored washer under a custom black counter
PHOTO BY KATE KUNZ/FANCY/ALAMY IMAGES

• Fits across the top of the washer and dryer for a large work surface for sorting, treating stains, and folding.

• Prevents items from falling in between or behind your machines.

• Could be a custom counter, or a prefab rubber tray (made by several manufacturers to complement their machines) that resists staining, has a built-in back-splash, and often comes with rear pockets for laundry supplies and other small items.

Keep It Safe

braided steel washer hose and adjustable wrench
PHOTO BY SHAFFER SMITH

Washer mishaps are among the leading causes of home floods, and dryers account for thousands of fires annually. But with some key supplies, you can avert disaster and save thousands. Here’s what you’ll need:

• Braided steel washer hoses, shown left, that can’t split open like rubber ones.

• Metal dryer-vent pipe sealed with foil tape, rather than a plastic flex hose, which is a fire hazard.

• A washer box that’s recessed in the wall so that water valves are easily accessible and hoses don’t loosen or get damaged by getting squished behind the machine.
Oatey Washing Machine Outlet Box, $23; The Home Depot

Safety (Continued)

worker moves a washer onto a washer drain pan
PHOTO BY SHAFFER SMITH

• An automatic shutoff valve that cuts water to the washer if it detects a leak or a burst hose.
FloodStop, $145; Amazon

• A washer drain pan (shown) to catch drips, especially for machines on main living levels.
1-2-3 Under Washer Tray, $30; Menards

Buying a Dryer: Gas or Electric?

pile of clean laundry
PHOTO BY ANDY CRAWFORD/GETTY IMAGES

The connections in your laundry room will likely dictate your choice. But if you have both a gas hookup and a 240-volt outlet, go for gas. It costs about $50 to $100 more than an electric model, but it’s cheaper to operate over the long haul—15 to 20 cents per load, compared with 30 to 40 cents for electric. Considering that the average American family does 300 loads of laundry a year, that’s an annual energy savings of $45 to $60 with gas.

Decoding Energy Star Labels

illustration of man staring at a washer with large label that says MEF and WF on it
ILLUSTRATION BY EDWIN FOTHERINGHAM

Most HE (high-efficiency) washers are also rated by MEF and WF. Here’s what the new acronyms mean:

MEF: Modified Energy Factor is a measure of the energy used to run the washer and heat the water. The higher the MEF, the more energy-efficient the washer.

WF: Water Factor is based on the number of gallons of water consumed per cubic foot of capacity. The lower the WF, the more miserly the washer.

Ventilation Checklist

dryer vent on outside of house with self-closing vent

• Make metal vent-pipe runs to the outdoors as short as possible, with limited bends for the best airflow (45 feet max, assuming two 90-degree bends).

• Install a self-closing exhaust vent, rather than a louvered one, to keep outdoor air from coming into your home when the dryer is off.

• Consider putting in a bathroom-type vent fan in the ceiling to prevent moisture buildup in a laundry with a stall shower or pet-care station.

The Right Ironing Board for You

a foldout ironing board and iron
PHOTO BY BOB STEFKO

If you’re the type to tote your wrinkled shirts to the den so you can watch TV while you press, go for the classic folding board. But if you prefer to iron in the laundry room, consider one of these built-in space-savers instead.

Drop-down board It stows in a recessed or wall-mount cabinet. Pricier models, such as the Deluxe Iron-A-Way Wall Ironing Board with a birch-veneer door ($351; Rockler), are configured with storage shelves and electrical outlets.

Foldout board This compact board unfolds from behind a false drawer front (shown) for a seamless look. The Rev-A-Shelf VIB Series Board ($179; Rockler) is sold as a kit that you can retrofit into an existing drawer.

The Best Basket If You…

a canvas laundry basket
PHOTO BY ALISON ROSA

Take sorting seriously: Individual stacking baskets that nest ($10 each), or a metal frame that holds multiple removable fabric bags ($35).

Like to roll: A wheeled garment rack with bins ($20 to $40).

Navigate stairs: Lightweight, soft-sided vertically shaped bins, similar to the loop-handled canvas one (shown, about $20 each). Traditional rectangular baskets are unwieldy and lead to scraped knuckles.

The New and Improved Utility Sink

laundry room utility sink
PHOTO BY JURGEN FRANK

Standard-issue plastic laundry tubs stain easily, lack under-sink storage, and are too deep to be practical. A better option is a 10- to 12-inch-deep square or rectangular stainless-steel sink with curved, easy-to-clean corners. Paired with a gooseneck faucet or one with a pull-out spray, the setup is perfect for doing delicates, washing hands, and filling buckets and watering cans.

Smart and Cheery Finish Materials

red and white checkerboard linoleum floor
PHOTO BY BOB STEFKO

Chemicals, water, and soiled items tend to get splashed, sprayed, and dumped in a laundry room, so when it comes to finishes, prioritize durability and affordability over luxury. But that doesn’t mean your room needs to be dull. Consider these hardworking, thrifty surface options that can also inject color and texture to liven up your laundry space.

Floors
Glue-down linoleum (shown), cork, and vinyl floors shrug off moisture with less upkeep than wood and without the worry of ceramic tiles’ cracking or dingy grout lines.

Finishes: Storage

open shelving in a laundry room, red bathing suit hanging
PHOTO BY JEAN ALLSOPP

Rather than closed cabinetry, consider open shelves and cubbies. To stylishly conceal clutter under a countertop, hang a curtain printed with a colorful pattern.

Finishes: Walls

laundry room with green walls
PHOTO BY ROGER DAVIES

Easy-to-wipe-clean semigloss paint, beadboard paneling, and glossy ceramic tiles can take a beating while injecting your laundry room with bright hues and personality.

Finishes: Countertops

Corian countertop in Silver Birch in a laundry room

Instead of natural stone, try nonporous solid surfacing, such as Corian (shown in Silver Birch), engineered stone, or laminate, which cost the same or less and come in muted and vibrant shades.

Which Lights Where

focus on overhead light in a laundry room
PHOTO BY NATHAN KIRKMAN

For general ambient illumination in addition to any natural light in the room, choose a low-profile ceiling-mount fixture. A pendant is a more stylish alternative, but steer clear of the folding area and upper cabinetry unless you want to play whack-a-lamp. For treating stains or spotting wrinkles while you iron, go with task lighting, such as LED undercabinet strips, which are energy efficient and stay cool to the touch, or focused overhead spots.

All the Extras

a laundry room with red walls, laundry chute, shower stall and island
PHOTO BY NATHAN KIRKMAN

There are dozens of ways to upgrade your laundry room, but which of the bells and whistles are really worth the extra money?

Worth the splurge
• Replacing an old washer. Switching out one that’s more than 10 years old for an Energy Star model can save you $35 a year in energy bills because they are 30 percent more efficient and use 50 percent less water. Plus, you may qualify for rebates and tax credits.

• Stainless-steel washer tubs and dryer drums. They last longer than plastic or porcelain-coated steel and won’t chip, crack, scratch, or leave rust stains on clothes.

• Laundry chute (1). If you’ve got a clear path between floors—no wiring, plumbing, or ductwork to contend with—eliminating those tiring trips down the stairs with arms full of dirties can be easier than you may think. Old-house owners may even be able to convert a decommissioned dumbwaiter.

• Simple shower stall (2). Use it to bathe the dog, rinse off muddy outdoor gear, and hang clothes as they drip-dry.

• Movable or built-in island (3). Not just for kitchens, these workhorses can serve as a folding table or a homework station with stool seating, and provide extra storage for cleaning products, the toolbox, even craft and gift-wrapping supplies.

Extras (Continued):

a laundry room with a flat-screen TV monitor
PHOTO BY TROY THIES/COLLINSTOCK

• Television (4). It’ll keep you entertained during long periods of folding and ironing.

Not worth the splurge
• Natural stone finishes, such as marble, for counters and floors. They require sealing to prevent staining and don’t absorb sound. With exceptions for high-visibility laundries, such as one that adjoins a kitchen where you want materials to match, they’re rarely worth the expense and upkeep.

• Drying cabinet. This armoire-like machine air-dries your clothes with gentle heat and uses 90 percent less energy than conventional dryers, but at $4,000, you’ll never recoup the cost.

• Jetted sinks with timers for hand washables. Most washing machines these days have extra-gentle cycles for delicates.

• Steam settings, which add some cleaning power to a washer but not enough to justify a couple hundred dollars more on the price tag.

• Interactive LCD displays on washers to track the progress of a load and get stain-removal tips.

• Built-in clothes bins. They hide dirties but tend to trap moisture and get smelly. Better to tuck bins into open cubbies where air can circulate around them.

3 Indoor Air-Dry Options

a laundry room with a hanging rod
PHOTO BY ANTHONY MASTERSON/GETTY IMAGES

Clothes dryers cost about $85 a year to run and are second only to refrigerators in terms of energy expenditure, so consider these electricity-free options when planning your new laundry room. Bonus: Air-drying causes less wear and tear on your clothes, so they’ll last longer and you won’t have to shop as often.

1. Hanging rod ($2–$3 per foot) Make it metal, and securely mount it to bear the weight of wet garments.

2. Retractable clothesline ($10–$50) Wall-mounted pull-out clotheslines, available as a single line or multiple lines. Set one up in a well-ventilated spot where you can lay down a towel to catch drips.

3. Foldaway rack ($10–$35) Choose from wood accordion-style and two-tier metal and mesh folding racks that expand to provide ample space to hang or to lay garments flat.

Multitasking Laundries

a laundry room and mudroom
PHOTO BY NATHAN KIRKMAN

The laundry room increasingly plays host to a variety of household chores and activities, from pet-grooming and potting to sewing and organizing sports gear, backpacks, and coats. Below, four double-duty rooms that do it well.

Mudroom
A laundry near the back entry allows family members to toss dirty sports clothes or soiled garden togs right into the washer so as not to track muck into the main living area. A boot bench with hooks above corrals coats and bags, and closed cabinetry keeps laundry supplies hidden from view.

Multitasking: Bathroom

a laundry room in the bathroom
PHOTO BY ERIC ROTH

Pull warm towels straight from the dryer in this combo room. A louvered door discreetly separates the laundry from the bathing area and provides extra ventilation for the machines.

Multitasking: Pet-Care Center

a laundry room and pet shower
PHOTO BY LAUREY W. GLENN

A shower pan on a raised platform beside the washer is designed for dog grooming, but also works great for spot-cleaning large items, like throw rugs.

Multitasking: Dressing Room

a laundry room and walk-in closet area
PHOTO BY OLSON PHOTOGRAPHIC/CORNERHOUSE STOCK

Clean clothes go straight from the dryer to the drawer in this walk-in closet, no hamper required. For efficiency, the homeowner opted for stacked machines and a built-in dresser that also serves as a folding table.

Marie Kondo’s Best Tips & Tricks!

As a company that consistently strives to create the most Envious spaces, we are always looking for new ways to do so! Right now, we are, like the rest of the country, enthralled by Marie Kondo and her methods!

Kondo has already been an icon for years due to her book “The life-changing magic of tidying up,” but has gained millions of new fans thanks to her new Netflix series “Tidying Up.”

The series has eight episodes, each featuring a different family that Kondo helps to declutter their lives. Each one has a theme, such as empty nesters who need to downsize or a family struggling to keep their home tidy with two toddlers.

Kondo’s calming presence gradually transforms the homes from chaotic to organized, with some on the show crying tears of gratitude for the peace and sense of ease she has brought to their homes.

Here is a rundown of some of Kondo’s best tips:

1. The best way to fold your clothes

Even if your house is perfectly organised, you should give Kondo’s folding system a try, it’s a gamechanger.

The idea is to fold your clothes into one long strip, fold this in half and then into thirds to create a small square that you can sit upright in your drawer. You can do this with everything including underwear and socks. It uses up less space and it’s easier to find what you want. Instead of rifling through your drawer and pulling out everything to find a particular shirt or dress, you can easily check to see if it’s there and then grab it without disturbing any of the other clothes. It’s also very addictive once you start.

2. Take an inventory of what you have

One of the first things that Kondo asks people to do is to dump all of their clothes in one spot so they can see everything they have. There’s nothing more motivating than seeing a huge pile of clothes, books or electronic cords to give you perspective on how much you really own. Putting everything together also makes you realize you don’t really need five extra extension chords or three whisks.

3. Declutter in a specific order

Kondo’s method suggests going through things such as clothes and books first because it’s easier to make a decision on these types of items. You can then move on to paper and a category she calls “komono,” which includes the bathroom, kitchen, garage and miscellaneous items. Sentimental items are left until last. This is because by the time you get to these items you will have refined your sense of what really “sparks joy.”

4. Does it ‘spark joy’?

Modal TriggerMarie Kondo
AP

Kondo believes the best way to chose whether or not to keep something is to hold each item in your hand and decide whether it sparks joy. This is an uplifting feeling that you get when you hold the item, and has nothing to do with whether the item is practical or you “should keep it.” Choosing items this way means that after you finish decluttering you will only be surrounded with items that make you happy, which is a great feeling.

5. Everything has a place

Kondo working at a client's home in Tokyo, Japan.
Kondo working at a client’s home in Tokyo, Japan.AP

Another great tip is to make sure there is a specific place for every item in your home. This means when something is out of place you can easily put it back where it should be. It also means that when you need to find something, you’ll know where to look. One benefit of decluttering is that you uncover things you thought were lost or forgot you had. And you actually start to use these things.

6. Respect your belongings

Taking the time to “greet your house” sounds pretty crazy but in every episode Kondo sits quietly and silently pays her respect to the house for what it has given the owner. She is also taking a moment to acknowledge the role that possessions play in people’s lives. As people declutter she also encourages them to thank each item for their service, which makes it easier to let go of once-cherished things. It also makes you appreciate what you have and to treat each item with respect.

7. Stay focused on your own stuff

When you live with others it can become frustrating to deal with other people’s clutter but Kondo doesn’t recommend interfering or taking control of other people’s belongings. She encourages people to concentrate on going through their own stuff and instead act like a role model for others in their lives. This will naturally inspire others to do the same. Instead of the tidying falling on one parent, for example, she encourages getting children involved in decluttering and tidying including things like folding clothes so everyone takes responsibility for their own possessions.

Once you’ve Decluttered your home, and you’d love a true showcase to respect all of your items, head to www.theclosetenvy.com and schedule your free consultation!

How to create an enviable Home Library

Where are you currently stashing your book collection? Are your books scattered around the house or maybe stowed away in the attic where they’re just sitting and collecting dust?

Not. Any. More.

Read on to learn 5 simple steps to getting the home library you deserve!

Step One: 

Go to www.theclosetenvy.com and book (pun intended) a free consultation so we can install beautiful built-ins in whichever room of your home you’d like to display your collection!

Step Two: 

Sorting. Now that you have your gorgeous new Closet Envy system, it’s time to go through your collection & start sorting! (Or we could do this for you… we include 4 hours of Professional Organizing with every purchase of $4,000+… just a thought!) 😉 You can sort your books by topic or color, depending on how you would like your library to function/ look aesthetically!

If you sort your books by topic:

  • Next you’ll want to sort them by weight & how often you will be pulling this book to read it!
  • Place the heavier books on the bottom shelves
  • Place the books you’ll be grabbing most often towards the ends of the rows (so you’re not grabbing books from the center too often).
  • Alternatively, you can sort them by topic & then by alphabetical order if that makes you happy! (Remember, we’re designing YOUR happy place!!)

If you sorted your books by color:

  • Create your rainbow! Done!

Step Three:

Fill in the gaps. If you have space for books that you intend to get in the future, you can fill the gaps with decorative items, get creative!

Step Four:

Look after your library, and keep it clean. Dust is the most common problem, but it can also be books not put back, leftover drinking cups, etc.

Step Five:

Enjoy! Find a cozy reading area where you can still occasionally gaze at your stunning new library, and get to reading!

How to Style Built-Ins – 10 Tips

At Closet Envy, we build more than just closets. Built-Ins are becoming increasingly popular as an addition to any room: from Offices to living rooms, they are a versatile addition to your home! With us smack-dab in the middle of the Holiday’s, it’s a good reminder that you can alternate decor in your Built-In to create a theme for each season! Try these tips below today before guests arrive & make your Built-In an Enviable statement piece:

1. Start with a blank slate.

As with any decorating, it’s always best to start with a clean slate.

Place all of your accessory potentials in one spot so that they’re easily accessible and you can “shop” from them while you’re filling the bookshelves.

2. Add books.

If you have plenty of books (or even just a few) that’s a great place to start.

They can be upright, laid down, leaned, stacked, grouped, placed backward or forward, bundled, sorted by color, and with or without covers – so think outside the box (or book, in this case).

When styling bookshelves, vary the heights of accessories for a more interesting look
Urban Gold Bookcase from Schneidermans

{We love the way Steph from Schneidermans used accessories as “book ends” on the bottom shelf above, too. Creative!}

3. Layer, stack, and hang.

Layering and stacking items creates depth, dimension, and visual interest.

Hanging accessories, such as mirrors or art, can add even more depth and yet another layer.

Accessorizing bookshelves
Meagan Rae Interiors

4. Vary heights.

There are times when you’ll intentionally group “like” items on a shelf to make a statement (case in point, the bookshelf at the beginning of this post).

But, other than that scenario, you’ll always want to make sure you vary the heights of your accessories to keep the eye moving and keep things interesting.

5. Consider contrast.

Dark items can sometimes get lost against a dark background, as well as white against white, so keep that in mind when choosing your accessories.

Accessories can get lost against a dark background, so keep that in mind when styling bookshelves.

6. Make it meaningful.

Displaying collections, momentos, and photographs in your bookshelves is a great way to keep the things that mean the most to you visible on a daily basis.

7. Come up for air.

Really full shelves can be a “look” if done right, but don’t be afraid to leave breathing space between accessories and allow them to shine.

8. Rotate.

The image below is from BHG and I liked what they have to say on this topic:

… resist the urge to add “just one more” item. If you have a large collection, rotate objects in and out from time to time, rather than displaying everything all at once, to ensure the vignette strays from cluttered territory.”

"Look for objects that have commonalities, such as white finishes, to create a more unified display. And resist the urge to add "just one more" item. If you have a large collection, rotate objects in and out from time to time, rather than displaying everything all at once, to ensure the vignette strays from cluttered territory."

9. Think outside the shelf.

Do the unexpected by hanging art or a mirror on the outside of bookshelves.  This can be a great idea in rooms where wall space is limited, too.

"I like to put the pattern on the floor and solids on the furniture," Phoebe Howard says. Family room rug by Tai Ping.
House Beautiful

10. Smaller isn’t always better.

Resist the temptation to fill small shelves with tiny accessories. Use fewer, larger, well-placed items for a really great look.

Use fewer, larger items on small shelves to make a statement when styling bookshelves
SHOPbookcase/room divider

Styling shelves in your built-in  is a process, so continually step back and assess as you’re placing items.

Pro Tip: snap a photo or two on your phone to see things from a completely different perspective, and to quickly spot changes that need to be made.  This same idea can work when you’re styling bookshelves.

Pocket Closets… how to maximize your space!

Even the smaller closets in your home deserve to be functional and worthy of envy.  Often referred to as “reach-in” or “pocket” closets, these smaller spaces can be quite versatile if you let them!Usually anywhere from 3 to 8 feet wide with a limited depth of 24 to 30 inches, reach-in closets are commonly found in hallways, kids’ rooms and bedrooms of older homes. These closets were originally designed with a single rod for hanging clothes under a shelf, with return walls that can limit access inside. But these days a wide variety of products allow you to create a more efficient space with numerous storage opportunities.

We offer numerous accessory options to add to these pocket closets to transform them into usable spaces that will save you time & energy each day. Adding drawers to this space is one way to immediately allow for a much greater efficiency in your closet. These drawers can allow you to have your socks and undergarments right there, making getting ready in the morning infinitely faster. It also can reduce or even eliminate the need for a large dresser, which can choke an already small room.
We also recommend that our clients add pull-down wardrobes for a more efficient hanging system for folded pants, skirts, jackets and other like items to gain space in this kind of closet.
Lastly, for reach-in closets with traditional hinged doors, you can increase storage by adding hooks or over door racks and pockets to the back of the door for things like keys and shoes. In some of our projects, we actually replace the hinged door with sliding doors (like barn doors) in order to conserve even more space!

Organize Toy Clutter

It’s summer time which means school is out and the kids are home…all…the…time. When children spend more time around the house the toys can get a bit out of control. Here are our favorite ways to organize toy clutter.

It's summer time which means school is out and the kids are home...all...the...time. When children spend more time around the house the toys can get a bit out of control. Here are our favorite ways to organize toy clutter. #getorganized #toyclutter

Organize Toy Clutter

Accept What Is

The reality is, if you have young children there will be toys. While there are tips to help deal with the clutter, Organizing Moms remind us that it is ok to stop worrying about it!

Accept that there will be neat days and there will be messy days. The pictures on Pinterest are not reality. The pictures of your kids happily playing trump the images of perfectly organized playrooms.

It's summer time which means school is out and the kids are home...all...the...time. When children spend more time around the house the toys can get a bit out of control. Here are our favorite ways to organize toy clutter. #getorganized #toyclutter

These days will be over before you know it, so on occasion, go ahead and embrace the mess…and the JOY!

Clear the Clutter

The more toys there are the more likely there will be a mess. So take some time now and then to clear the clutter. Here are a few steps to get you started.

  • Get rid of the plastic junk. You know, all those little toys that come in kids meals. It’s time to let those things go.
  • Anything that is broken can go as well. That’s what we call the easy good-bye.
  • Pull out the toys that are no longer age appropriate. Either store for another child, or donate them.
  • Involve your children in the purge. Talk to them about donating toys to those in need and let them help you decide what can go.

It's summer time which means school is out and the kids are home...all...the...time. When children spend more time around the house the toys can get a bit out of control. Here are our favorite ways to organize toy clutter. #getorganized #toyclutter

Little House Lovely Home has these tips for involving your children in donating toys.

Giving or donating to other kids in need is a great way to clear toy clutter. BUT, how you approach this strategy with your kids depends on their age. 5 year olds are starting to understand how privileged they are, and begin showing a genuine interest in helping others. Younger children won’t even pass a toy to baby brother without a tantrum. If your kids are older, talk to them about passing on the toys they don’t use to other children.

A Place for Everything

If you have a designated place for everything your children will be much more likely to put things away. Apartment Therapy has these suggestions:

Have one designated area for toys and decide that all toys that stay in the house need to fit in that place. It could be a basket, or a toy chest, or a bookshelf with several bins. Decide what goes where, and let this be a measure of whether you are accumulating too many toys. I have a large toy basket to hold the majority of my daughter’s toys (which doesn’t include stuffed animals and books), and I know its time to get rid of some things when that basket can’t hold all her toys.

It's summer time which means school is out and the kids are home...all...the...time. When children spend more time around the house the toys can get a bit out of control. Here are our favorite ways to organize toy clutter. #getorganized #toyclutter

You can take the keep-all-the-toys-in-one-place route, or go for baskets where the toys are used most scenario. Either way when it comes to toy organization baskets and bins are the perfect solution.

We’re Your Fairy Godmother

Do you wish you had a fairy godmother you could call on to organize the toy clutter? We can help! Schedule your free consultation today. We can create a toy organization system that is perfect for your family’s needs!

It's summer time which means school is out and the kids are home...all...the...time. When children spend more time around the house the toys can get a bit out of control. Here are our favorite ways to organize toy clutter. #getorganized #toyclutter

Children’s Closet Projects for Summer

School is out for the summer! The joy of that moment lasts approximately 3.2 seconds before the arguing and “I’m bored” whining begins. When you are looking for something to do give one of these closet projects for summer a try!

School is out for the summer! The joy of that moment lasts approximately 3.2 seconds before the arguing and "I'm bored" whining begins. When you are looking for something to do give one of these closet projects for summer a try! #getorganized #putthosekidstowork

Closet Projects for Summer

Let the Chores Begin

Many parents want to balance the time their children spend on screens with activities that are a bit more productive. You can find chore charts all over the internet, like this free one, that allow you to incorporate a “before you play” lifestyle in your home. It’s time to start getting things done around the house!

School is out for the summer! The joy of that moment lasts approximately 3.2 seconds before the arguing and "I'm bored" whining begins. When you are looking for something to do give one of these closet projects for summer a try! #getorganized #putthosekidstowork

We’d like to suggest that in addition to things like dishes, dusting, or scrubbing toilets you add a few closet chores to the list! Better Homes & Gardens reminds us that kids can organize too!

Let children be a part of the organization process and you might be surprised by how willing they are to help declutter the space and keep the closet organized. Encourage little ones to tell you how they’d like to sort and store their favorite items, or let them choose what kids’ closet dividers they like best. Work together with older kids to get organized, then turn them loose to decorate the space with their favorite colors and patterns.

Encourage those youngsters to purge unwanted items, organize their clothes, and get their closet under control! When school rolls around again you will be so glad that you took the time to get the closet organized during the not-so-lazy days of summer.

Summer Learning

Just because your kids aren’t in school doesn’t mean they can’t continue to learn. Consider this summer your training period so that you can start moving laundry off your shoulders and onto theirs! Children as young as 2 can fold clothes and even put shirts on a hanger. And there is no reason your teenager can’t start doing their own laundry! (Just remind them that yes, soap is needed in every load. Trust me on that one.) Do you know what that means?!! Those little people can start putting away their own clothes!! Game changer right there.

School is out for the summer! The joy of that moment lasts approximately 3.2 seconds before the arguing and "I'm bored" whining begins. When you are looking for something to do give one of these closet projects for summer a try! #getorganized #putthosekidstowork

With an organized closet its so much easier to know where everything goes. Better Homes & Gardens has these tips.

Label types of clothing and accessories to keep things organized. Color-coordinated containers can do the trick, too. Over time, your child will learn the difference between clothing items, as well as the value of organization. For a personal touch to your kid’s closet storage, pick labels in his or her favorite color. Kids’ closet organizer products can be found at most home goods stores or you can make your own with construction paper, washi tape, and markers.

Organizing is the same as sorting…so that’s math. Creating labels is reading and writing. Creating your own labels is essentially art class. So there you go! Summer school and closet organization all at once. You’ve officially earned rock star mom status!

Or You Can Be the Fun Mom

It’s possible your offspring may be complaining about your genius closet projects for summer. With these suggestions you can go from mean mom to fun mom! Let your child know that once their closet is clean and organized they could create a reading nook or closet fort.

School is out for the summer! The joy of that moment lasts approximately 3.2 seconds before the arguing and "I'm bored" whining begins. When you are looking for something to do give one of these closet projects for summer a try! #getorganized #putthosekidstowork

Every child loves the idea of a special place just for them. Create a design together and then help your child find all the resources they need to get started. They might just thank you for making them clean and organize their closet. Ok, probably not, but a mom can dream!

Put Us to Work

Your kids are working on their closets, so why not let us come work on yours! Make this the summer of closets. We’ll bring the showroom to you and take care of every last detail. You can put up your feet and relax with a good book. Schedule your free consultation today!

Baby Closet Organization Ideas

You’ve been spending day and night making sure the nursery is ready for your new baby. Now that your friends have showered you with gifts, its time to turn your attention to the closet. Here are our favorite tips for organizing a nursery closet!

You've been spending day and night making sure the nursery is ready for your new baby. Now that your friends have showered you with gifts, its time to turn your attention to the closet. Here are our favorite tips for organizing a nursery closet!

Organize by Size

Infants go through sizes at lightning speed. Which makes organizing their clothes a special situation. Homedit suggests you section the clothes.

First things first, sort through your baby’s clothes. From Newborn to 12 months, you’ll need to grab some closet dividers and get started placing each onesie and outfit into the right spot. This will make it easier for mom to find the right sizes and make it so you use all those gorgeous outfits before baby outgrows them!

You've been spending day and night making sure the nursery is ready for your new baby. Now that your friends have showered you with gifts, its time to turn your attention to the closet. Here are our favorite tips for organizing a nursery closet!

We recommend hanging as much as you can. It’s much easier to see what you have when the items are hung by size in the closet. Once clothing gets put in a drawer it can easily get covered or shoved to the back. You don’t want to miss out on some of your favorite outfits because you can’t see them!

Extra Items

Babies come with so many teeny tiny accessories. Bibs, hats, socks, shoes, pacifiers…oh my. A Night Owl Blog suggests adding baskets to drawers to organize those items.

You can use baskets in drawers to make organization easier! I grabbed shallow baskets that are making our top drawer much less of a mess. They’re great for corralling baby socks, hats, lovies and more!

You've been spending day and night making sure the nursery is ready for your new baby. Now that your friends have showered you with gifts, its time to turn your attention to the closet. Here are our favorite tips for organizing a nursery closet!

Shelf It Up

If you have shelves in your closet you can use them to store a plethora of items. Stuffed animals, blankets, and clothes that are too big or too small. You will be able to find plenty of ways to utilize the shelf space in your baby’s closet.

Shelves are another great place to utilize baskets. They can hold items that are difficult to corral and keep things looking nice and clean. Put larger baskets or bins on the floor to hold stuffed animals or toys. So you know, baskets can hold babies too. All the toys will probably end up on the floor with a baby in the basket. That’s just the way life with children goes.

You've been spending day and night making sure the nursery is ready for your new baby. Now that your friends have showered you with gifts, its time to turn your attention to the closet. Here are our favorite tips for organizing a nursery closet!

Don’t Forget the Design

Your nursery is the most adorable space in your house. Why shouldn’t the nursery closet be just as lovely? Project Nursery reminds us to remember the design elements when pulling together a nursery closet.

Sleek shelves, full-sized dressers, adorable baskets and bins are accentuated with wallpaper, artwork and even rugs. Watch out teeny tiny baby clothes, you may have trouble competing with these stellar inside-the-closet designs.

You've been spending day and night making sure the nursery is ready for your new baby. Now that your friends have showered you with gifts, its time to turn your attention to the closet. Here are our favorite tips for organizing a nursery closet!

 

Let Us Help You Nest the Nursery

When baby is on the way sometimes you just want to delegate the organizational tasks. The designers at Closet Envy can help you take your dream nursery closet from vision to reality. Schedule your free consultation when you are ready to nest the nursery. We’re happy to help!

You've been spending day and night making sure the nursery is ready for your new baby. Now that your friends have showered you with gifts, its time to turn your attention to the closet. Here are our favorite tips for organizing a nursery closet!